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Employer may seek legal action against me?

My employer is seeking legal action against me. What can I do about it? I worked for this company for over 16 years in a manger position. The last 3 years they hired a new boss that was a nightmare to work for. I made many attempts to work with him however we could never see eye to eye. I eventually filed a formal complaints with our HR group and that backed fired because he was protected. Other people filed similar complaints and where also label. Therefore I decide to move on and find a new job which I did. I left in good terms I provided two weeks notice I provided a detailed list of open and pending projects. I sat down with my manager and some of my peers and openly discussed everything that was on the list.

I thought that was the end. However about 30-40 days ago I started to get contacted by friends that work in the company indicating that this manager was blaming me for his short comings. At first I disregarded the comments but they continued to blame me, in addition they started to tell customers. I heard this part directly from the customer. I was upset so I sent an email to the customers upper management and I laid out that this was a lie and that my employer was made aware prior to my leaving of all the projects and issues that needed to be followed up.

The email was anonymous but as we all know nothing is anonymous on the INTERNET. My former employer hired an investigator and he found out it was me. I admitted to it, the investigator told me that no legal action will be taken against my person but this was verbal I do not trust him or my ex employer. However I think my employer wants to seek legal action against me. The stuff I said in the email is fact, I did not lie I basically pointed out the gaps and why they had these gaps. I kept documentation, emails, notes , copies of all my records therefore I can prove that I warned my ex employer to keep up with these projects because it come back to bight them in the butt.
I know I should have thought things through better but they were dragging my name in the mud and damaging my reputation. I screwed up but I cannot take it back Any suggestions or ideas. I never signed any confidential or privacy agreement

This can really go either way. I doubt the company would go through the trouble of hiring an investigator if they are not considering legal action. Obviously, you should have never sent the e-mail. If anything, you will have to compensate your ex-employer for the loss of the customer if that happened due to your e-mail. Some places call it "tortious interference" meaning you interfered with the company’s business relationship. I honestly do not think you have a defense, even if the statements were true. Just because they were true doesn’t mean that your interference didn’t cause damage to your ex-employer.

In my experience as a paralegal, I have to admit that I think you were duped into admitting your guilt. Using logic, why would you admit to sending the e-mail? If it was "anonymous", all you should have stated was, "Show me the proof." You are NEVER obligated to admit anything to an "investigator" unless he/she is an actual police officer, which most "investigators" are not. Their number one trick is to bluff you into admitting you did it, which it seems they were successful at. Unless the investigator physically showed you proof, he/she lied to you. It is the cheapest way to get the information their client needs.

Even if you did not sign a no compete agreement, you may still be guilty of tortious interference. No agreement bars you from damaging an existing business relationship.


2 Comments

  1. ranger_co_1_75

    It depends on the laws of your state and what you said. In my state, the business can sue someone for interfering with their relationship with a customer. Your state may be different.

    As far as blaming you for their faults, there isn’t much you can do unless you can show a financial loss due to their actions. You could sue for slander if you can prove what they say is false, but all you would receive is a court order saying their allegations were not true, $1 in compensation, and a huge attorney bill.

    If they went to the expense to hire an investigator to locate you, they most likely will pursue the matter. If you receive a demand letter for compensation, contact an attorney right away.References :

  2. Prorkycake

    This can really go either way. I doubt the company would go through the trouble of hiring an investigator if they are not considering legal action. Obviously, you should have never sent the e-mail. If anything, you will have to compensate your ex-employer for the loss of the customer if that happened due to your e-mail. Some places call it "tortious interference" meaning you interfered with the company’s business relationship. I honestly do not think you have a defense, even if the statements were true. Just because they were true doesn’t mean that your interference didn’t cause damage to your ex-employer.

    In my experience as a paralegal, I have to admit that I think you were duped into admitting your guilt. Using logic, why would you admit to sending the e-mail? If it was "anonymous", all you should have stated was, "Show me the proof." You are NEVER obligated to admit anything to an "investigator" unless he/she is an actual police officer, which most "investigators" are not. Their number one trick is to bluff you into admitting you did it, which it seems they were successful at. Unless the investigator physically showed you proof, he/she lied to you. It is the cheapest way to get the information their client needs.

    Even if you did not sign a no compete agreement, you may still be guilty of tortious interference. No agreement bars you from damaging an existing business relationship.References :

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